If proven, G4S executives should face prison for embezzling huge sums of public money

The exposure of G4S and Serco for stealing from the public purse on an industrial scale is symptomatic of privatised Britain.   The findings of an initial inquiry that G4S had ‘overcharged’ tens of millions of pounds on electronic tagging contracts for offenders who had moved abroad, died, returned to prison so they were no … Continue reading If proven, G4S executives should face prison for embezzling huge sums of public money

Finucane: the full truth will only be known from a full public inquiry

The report of Sir Desmond de Silva contains important new information, but it is not the whole truth about Pat Finucane’s murder in 1989.   That still requires the exhaustive, independent investigation of a fully equipped public inquiry.   Whilst Cameron certainly admitted to ‘shocking’ official ‘collusion’ by the British State in a terrible killing, it is still far from … Continue reading Finucane: the full truth will only be known from a full public inquiry

Security services take big step closer to full State surveillance

The government has quietly agreed to European measures that will open the gates to full-scale surveillance by the State.   The current Communications and Data Bill now going through Parliament won’t, according to the Home Office, allow access to the content of phone calls, emails, texts or social media, but the government has at the same … Continue reading Security services take big step closer to full State surveillance

Privatisating benefits the public? – pull the other one

So the latest Tory wheeze to commercialise the NHS is to get hospitals to sell their services abroad, using the NHS brand to rake in more private money (which would not of course be necessary if the government were not imposing £20bn cuts over 5 years).   It is claimed that NHS patients will benefit.   But … Continue reading Privatisating benefits the public? – pull the other one

Labour must challenge the canard: public sector bad, private sector good

Nothing shows more starkly the relentless grip on the public consciousness (and above all the politicians) that the corporate sector has secured than the absurd fixation with outsourcing.   It is automatically assumed to be more efficient, more innovative, more dynamic.   Sometimes it is, sometimes it all ends in tears and the State has to pick … Continue reading Labour must challenge the canard: public sector bad, private sector good

Do the public want a privatised police?

The argument put forward by the West Midlands and Surrey forces in putting out a £1.5bn contract for greater private sector involvement in policing is that it would allow private companies to carry out routine and repetitive tasks at cheaper rates whilst allowing highly trained and professional police officers to concentrate more time on key … Continue reading Do the public want a privatised police?

We need a public inquiry into Southern Cross & the maraudings of private equity

Prior to the meetings today and Wednesday between Southern Cross, their 80 landlords and Department of Health officials, I am tabling the following EDM: “That this House, noting that when Southern Cross, Britain’s largest provider of care homes for the elderly, was floated on the stock market by private equity firm Blackstone in 2006, it … Continue reading We need a public inquiry into Southern Cross & the maraudings of private equity

Osborne policy backfires as public borrowing rises

The latest figures for public sector net borrowing, which show levels 50% higher this April compared with April last year just before the election, are the first clear signs that the Osborne massive cuts strategy is not just in serious trouble, but going backwards.   This will come as no great surprise to those who have always … Continue reading Osborne policy backfires as public borrowing rises

Greening public expenditure

So that hedonistic voluptuary strutting his permatanned corpulence (as the Guardian nicely described him yesterday), Sir Philip Green, is to be the new arbiter of what public services we will have and what we will not.   WHAT?    A man, whose family fortune (including his wife esconced in Monaco handily beyond the reach of the taxman … Continue reading Greening public expenditure